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  • Team Kiron

Embrace Change To Transform

By Rajgopal Nidamboor

 

Ever thought that the winds of change are ‘rattling’ you off your mind, if not feet? Think again, because it is the right moment to fasten your safety belt, while using your inner strength. It is time too to ‘root’ for philosophy and our inner spiritual leanings. This is simply because if only we are anchored to our ground, using our internal resources, such as confidence, optimism and courage, it is possible, in the midst of epic change, to stay calm in the wake of a squall. Yet, it is obvious that not all of us demonstrate composure, if not nerve, to keep cool. We are marooned, also diverted, by a whole new technological ‘smorgasbord,’ shallow celebrity events, or gross personal promotion under the travesty of social responsibility.



It is apparent that when trepidation obscures our mind and deprives our heart of its utmost potential, we are embracing fear, not change. On the contrary, when we rise to the occasion, in our own humble ways, with our resident resources, such as patience, compassion, integrity, belief, wit, empathy, or forgiveness, we’d welcome change with the power of our soul. You’d call it by any name. It corresponds to just one element — grace, or poise. Or, elegance under pressure — with no sign of hostility, anger, or dread.


This is an achievable prospect — you don’t need a college degree for it. It is something that nature has installed in us. It is something that we are all born with, no matter our background, colour, or pedigree. It also relates to cultivating a winning attitude, or learning to adapt. Or, be ever prepared for tomorrow — in the present-moment.

 

Rajgopal Nidamboor, PhD, is a wellness physician-writer-editor, independent researcher, columnist, author, and publisher. His published work includes hundreds of newspaper, magazine, Web articles, essays, meditations, columns, and critiques on a host of subjects, aside from four books on natural health, two coffee table tomes, a handful of eBooks, and an encyclopedic treatise on Indian philosophy. He calls himself an irrepressible idealist. What he likes best is spending quality time with his family and close friends, and in reading, writing, listening to music, watching cricket/old movies, and mindful meditation. He lives in Navi Mumbai, India.

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