top of page
  • Team Kiron

The Quest for Success

By Rajgopal Nidamboor

 

It is a given that harmony and balance are prerequisites for true success and happiness. This is because the quest for success should be an exciting and fulfilling adventure.



Let us shed new light on an age-old dictum — that it helps to draw inspiration from the great thinkers of the past, and present, and explore the continued relevance of their message in the troubled times we live in today. This is primarily because the kind of success that we are all aiming at is available to every human being — living, breathing and thinking. This also means using your talents and following your heart, and not equating wealth, fame, power, or high social status, with success.


The next best thing to do is using your power of imaginative vision, self-talk, inner self-reminders, and envisioning goals and, of course, persistence. When you integrate them at the most fundamental level as part of your life, also habit, along with a clear conception, also self-assurance, focus, dogged consistency, emotional pledge, good disposition, and the ability to relish the process, you’ve done yourself a big favour.


Philosophers often equate the basic dimensions of our life with intellectual dimension, or truth; aesthetic dimension, or beauty; moral dimension, or goodness; and, spiritual dimension, or the transcendent, along with a dogged purpose to doing well and getting things done — come what may.


As Benjamin Disraeli articulated, "The secret of success is constancy of purpose.” Its whole credo is within you and in your hands — to just do it with all your heart, mind, and soul.


 

Rajgopal Nidamboor, PhD, is a wellness physician-writer-editor, independent researcher, columnist, author, and publisher. His published work includes hundreds of newspaper, magazine, Web articles, essays, meditations, columns, and critiques on a host of subjects, aside from four books on natural health, two coffee table tomes, a handful of eBooks, and an encyclopedic treatise on Indian philosophy. He calls himself an irrepressible idealist. What he likes best is spending quality time with his family and close friends, and in reading, writing, listening to music, watching cricket/old movies, and mindful meditation. He lives in Navi Mumbai, India.

Comments


bottom of page